“Fire and Ice” Will Explore the Lake’s Volcanic Past


Freedom — July 15, 2007 — Most of us know the Ossipee Range for its beauty: a scenic set of mountains to the west that can be seen from all parts of the lake system, most spectacularly from the big lake.

Geologists, however, know the Ossipee Range for its history, as it is the remains of a massive volcano that towered thousands of feet above the landscape 120 million years ago. Those remains are so unique that they have been studied by scientists worldwide.

The fascinating story of the Ossipee Mountains, including how Ossipee Lake was formed, will be told by noted Smith College geologist Dr. Robert Newton in “Fire and Ice,” a special Tales of Ossipee Lake event on Saturday, July 21 at 8 PM, under the tent at Calumet Conference Center.

The event is free, but voluntary contributions will be encouraged with all proceeds going to benefit the Ossipee Conservation Commission’s fund for the “Window on the Ossipee Mountains” project. The Commission hopes to purchase 26 acres of roadside property on the western side of Route 16 at the site of a former golf driving range near Boulder Farm.

The site is the finest view from the highway of 2,975-foot Mt. Shaw and the neighboring peaks of this world-famous geologic complex. Besides protecting the scenic vista, the “Window” project will reclaim valuable open brushy wildlife habitat, which is fast diminishing in New Hampshire and New England along with the habitat’s associated species. A roadside pull-off for viewing and a nature trail for permanent public access, recreation and education are also planned.

This special event will be part of Watershed Weekend, co-sponsored by Ossipee Lake Alliance and Green Mountain Conservation Group. Enjoy a day on the lake, and then stay for “Fire and Ice.” A complete schedule of events is available at www.gmcg.org. Calumet Conference Center is on Ossipee Lake Road in Freedom. Directions are available online at www.calumet.org or by phone at 603-539-4773.

“Fire and Ice” Will Explore the Lake’s Volcanic Past